Friday, April 10, 2015

Absolutely Authentic from A to Z! Independent

Independence is what I always wanted from the time I was like 2.  At least that is what my parents have told me.  Isn't that what every 2 year old wants?  I saw a friend post the other day... that her two year old was like, "Me do it."  That's the phase of life....but I am not sure we ever truly grow out of it.  What does living authentically independent mean to me? 

I think it means that I go for what I want.  It means that I listen to people, but I don't let them get me down.  It also means that I don't trust a lot.  Most of my posts so far have been about good things I find in myself.  Being absolutely independent isn't necessarily a quality that I think is good.  I find that it means I would rather do something myself because I have found that I can't depend on others for a lot of things.  People let me down  A LOT.  Because people aren't perfect.  Too bad, right?  I find myself too often just wanting to be alone because people create drama, and I am soooo tired of drama! 

Often when I talk about the places I have lived, and the things that I have done, those that have never experienced true independence question me.  "What you really did all of that on your own."  You just packed up and moved to another country without knowing anyone.  Yes, I did and I survived.  Once when talking to my Dad, I was apologizing for leaving yet again and moving to the other side of the world.  His response, "We taught you to be independent, we didn't want you hanging onto our apron strings your whole life."  How thankful am I for that?  So very thankful! 

What about you?  Are you independent?  Do you find yourself untrustworthy that others will be there for you?  Are you too dependent?  How does authentic independence fit into your life? 









6 comments:

John Holton said...

That might be the hardest thing about being partially handicapped: I need Mary's help for so many things that I used to just take for granted, like tying my shoes (I had shoes with velcro, but they wore out and I can't find ones in my size with it), cutting my meat (I no longer eat anthing that it would take two hands to handle), driving, etc. I miss those things...

John Holton
Blogging from A to Z 2015 Cohost
The Sound of One Hand Typing

Tawnya Rivers said...

That would be really hard! I am sure that you miss that. Makes me find more things to be thankful for, and not take for granted!

Cathrina Constantine said...

Nice to meet you Tawnya~ I guess I'm not very independent. I could never leave my family unless it was a dire emergency.

Nancy said...

Well said. I do think independence is very important. I also think that it is easier to achieve if you know you have a safety net, like parents or friends or someone you trust to help if things go wrong. I'm not saying you can't achieve independence all alone, I'm just saying its less stressful when you know you're not.

Samantha Dunaway Bryant said...

I value my independence, too; it's really hard for me to ask for and accept help, even when I need it desperately, but I am getting better at it. I no longer see needing support as a personal failing. Nice post!

Tawnya Rivers said...

I agree about the safety net!!! Thanks for reading everyone!!! You are right I think needing support is okay, as long as it doesn't become what is holding you back!